The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Talk to your hearts content.....but keep it sweet! No record sales, live events listings or ebay labba labba.

Moderator: B&F Moderator

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby lankou » Mon Dec 04, 2017 8:29 pm

Manwel is quite right, in a way, but given the amount of releases throughout the world (and not just JA and GB,as it used to be) every month there is still a fair number of good tunes released each and every year. It's just that your average older reggae fan (especially from the anglo-saxon world) just has to learn to be a tad more curious and stop grumbling while following the once well-trodden paths.
Actually, people produce killer authentic old school reggae (and related genres) in the 4 corners of the world - part of it with JA vocalists, besides it all. This year, i've heard solid sounds from Israel, Argentina, the USA,GB (and not that dreaded electro-stepper!), Japan,Brazil, Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Italy,Sweden, JA and probably more countries. None of them stiff steppers, some digital,a lot "organic",sometimes on analog equipment.
And, once again, there is no such thing as a "European standard" : this is a caricature ! If this stepper scene is the most important scene right now, it must be for a reason, and not just the fact that they are an offshoot of the tecno scene : they have earned their stripes, got themselves organised and did what they found hey had to do to support their scene. Meanwhile, what were the other reggae factions doing? Building up silly buzzes bitching, grumbling and backstabbing each and everyone, but also getting more and more narrow-minded in niches which got tinier and tinier.
Once you could go to a dance and hear dancehall,roots, foundation tunes : ska and rocksteady and lovers' rock. Who does that nowadays?
Abusive segmentation is what is really killing reggae, no need to look further ! It is sad to see kids nowadays who have a very fragmented view of what JA music really is, despite a wide access to a huge amount of different genres and sub-genres online. We live in a world of little boxes, also projected in the musical world.
lankou
 
Posts: 1193
Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 11:46 pm
Location: paris

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby Dread Archive » Mon Dec 04, 2017 8:59 pm

There is great reggae music being played these days by bands & musicians from all over the world that play live as seen on YouTube. a lot of these countries are very poor & do not get involved with releasing tunes because they will lose money & it is not in their interest to do so. As I have already said playing live & touring is how people earn monies for the hard work they put in. The UK seems to be left behind in techno reggae paying £50 a riddim & £50 for the vocalists which just gets churned out to keep the UK riddim makers & producers in business, since they are not musicians. The time has come where musicians have over taken producers in quality music. The producers rely on releases vinyl, CD & digital downloads rather than live engineering on live shows. Too long has producers been putting musicians out of work with releases & it's about time musicians get reggae out of the digital compression & stuck on a computer. Lots of jobs for musicians & the producers don't like it because it is affecting business. I am very up to date, shame the digital scene has seen it's last days because people want real music. Back to the roots.
Dread Archive
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:45 pm

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby Leo5 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:01 pm

Wait how can there be “lots of work for musicians” while producers are “putting musicians out of work” ? Those two statements are inconsistent. Ask any reggae musician (in jamaica ) and they will tell you how slim the pickins are. That’s why the studio musicians are all aging - no money it for young people to want to get into it. The money they get for touring with artists is downright sad. The best they can hope for is to join a band that doesn’t break up. And if a producer hires musicians, they can be assured they won’t usually make that money back. Do you have that kind of money?

People are forgetting that re vinyl sales, reggae no longer has any proper distribution. There is one main middle man and a few others (themselves largely beholden to that middleman) that can move some quantity. So, in place of quantity of sales being the goal, we see this artificial scarcity tactic taking hold. Everything is “limited edition” for no other reason to create urgency and a quick sellout while guaranteeing you can hold back copies to sell for inflated sums not long after release . Clearly there is more demand than 250-300 records, yet people don’t press more - a particularly egregious example being Rasta nuh gangster. I long for the day when we stop treating discs of plastic like diamonds.

The analog argument is well past its sell-by date and the genie is out of the bottle. Unless you are sending a reel to reel tape to some mastering facility that is itself all analog, it will be reduced to a digital WAV at some point even if everything previous was analog. Do you have that kind of money?
Leo5
 
Posts: 496
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2005 8:52 am

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby Reggaemusicstore » Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:44 pm

Dread Archive wrote:There is great reggae music being played these days by bands & musicians from all over the world that play live as seen on YouTube. a lot of these countries are very poor & do not get involved with releasing tunes because they will lose money & it is not in their interest to do so. As I have already said playing live & touring is how people earn monies for the hard work they put in. The UK seems to be left behind in techno reggae paying £50 a riddim & £50 for the vocalists which just gets churned out to keep the UK riddim makers & producers in business, since they are not musicians. The time has come where musicians have over taken producers in quality music. The producers rely on releases vinyl, CD & digital downloads rather than live engineering on live shows. Too long has producers been putting musicians out of work with releases & it's about time musicians get reggae out of the digital compression & stuck on a computer. Lots of jobs for musicians & the producers don't like it because it is affecting business. I am very up to date, shame the digital scene has seen it's last days because people want real music. Back to the roots.


I'm very confused by this. If the "riddim makers" aren't musicians then what are they? Now regarding producers, if you were talking about the veterans in JA then most of them weren't musicians but as you're talking about what's happening now, most of the current producers are musicians. They may not be great musicians - I play a lot of instruments on my own productions even though I freely admit I'm not a great musician - but they're the ones making the music most of the time, whether you like that music or not.
Reggaemusicstore
 
Posts: 2170
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 7:48 pm
Location: London

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby Dread Archive » Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:58 pm

There 2 types of musician these days - The players of instruments that do music in real time live & the ones that play 4 bars on a keyboard then change the 4 bar track by editing & then they loop the 4 bars they just edited. It is cheaper for the producer to make the tune than get real musicians in. It has always been a problem between musicians & producers for decades in JA. The house bands in JA that knew how to create something out of nothing. Then it gets troublesome once the producer wants to release it. It costs nothing for a musician to pick up their instrument & start making music. Busking cuts out the middle man. It shows these new producers can't afford to pay musicians. Back to the roots.

As for the drum machine studios of JA like Exterminator & others there was live drum machine work going on so no 4 bars would be the same throughout the tune. Exterminator would also not loop or sequence tracks & that is the difference between JA digital & UK digital.
Dread Archive
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:45 pm

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby mikus » Fri Dec 08, 2017 4:18 pm

How are vinyl sales these days - as opposed to say 2010?
User avatar
mikus
 
Posts: 438
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2010 5:43 pm
Location: south london

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby guillaumebougard » Fri Dec 08, 2017 8:16 pm

Dread Archive wrote:As for the drum machine studios of JA like Exterminator & others there was live drum machine work going on so no 4 bars would be the same throughout the tune. Exterminator would also not loop or sequence tracks & that is the difference between JA digital & UK digital.


I can assure you that most drum machine tracks played for Xterminator (or any drum machine tracks) are loops
I've seen Sly zillions of times producing drum tracks with his MPC and that's what he does: program a loop with several kicks, then snares, percussions, cymbals, etc... and have the engineer loop it to last 4 minutes.
_______________________________________________________________________
Guillaume Bougard
guillaume.bougard@gmail.com
http://www.tabou1records.wordpress.com
https://www.facebook.com/slyandrobbieofficial
guillaumebougard
 
Posts: 1241
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 8:28 pm

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby lankou » Fri Dec 08, 2017 8:47 pm

Yes, but Sly is first and foremost a musician who kept on growing with the next level of music creation, that was digital programming. In this regard, he definitely remained a musician, not just yor basic progammer. Same with Steely & Cleavie, Lenky and others who should deserve more recogition for their achievements. They can all be heard in a lot of current "urban" music, sometimes almost 30 years later. Maybe some people won't call it reggae but some of these late 80's/90's sounds were some of the purest jamaican vibes ever.
Those guys recorded the real "tropical house" years before that dreaded term was invented by some hack journo.
lankou
 
Posts: 1193
Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 11:46 pm
Location: paris

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby Inyaki » Sat Dec 09, 2017 12:44 am

guillaumebougard wrote:
Dread Archive wrote:As for the drum machine studios of JA like Exterminator & others there was live drum machine work going on so no 4 bars would be the same throughout the tune. Exterminator would also not loop or sequence tracks & that is the difference between JA digital & UK digital.


I can assure you that most drum machine tracks played for Xterminator (or any drum machine tracks) are loops
I've seen Sly zillions of times producing drum tracks with his MPC and that's what he does: program a loop with several kicks, then snares, percussions, cymbals, etc... and have the engineer loop it to last 4 minutes.


Of course is looped...one only has too listen to it...if one can tell the difference.
Inyaki
 
Posts: 1241
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 11:07 pm
Location: South London

Re: The Fall In Vinyl Sales

Postby Dread Archive » Sat Dec 09, 2017 1:17 am

Drum machines can also do 16 bars, 32 bars, 48 bars riddims without loops. So maybe 3 loops in a 32 bar riddim in the whole tune. The musician / producer / engineer that made the large bar riddims keeps it like that. Other producer / engineers make 4 bars loops because they don't know what to do with a 32 bar loop / riddim.
Dread Archive
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:45 pm

Previous

Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 17 guests