Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

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Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby johnnyB » Mon Jul 16, 2012 12:40 pm

Just finished reading this book I found by chance on Amazon.Published in 2011 it relates the tribulations of singer/producer Junia Walker from Jamaica to New York to London.A close friend of Keith Hudson,the author is responsible for coproducing a lot of his works during the 70's including the Pick A Dub album reissued by B&F.And the description of the Jamaican music business in those years is the highlight of the book.Though not a masterpiece the spontaneity and the description of first person experiences make this a enjoyable and interesting read for all those who were not there at the time but would have liked.
...who feels it knows it...
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby kalcidis » Mon Jul 16, 2012 12:48 pm

I'm on the last pages of Beth Lesser's new book (which is nothing less than crucial) so I'll definitely pick up this one and let it be the next book to be read. I like a lot of Junias productions/releases. Like Frankie Paul's Gunman Around Town. A lot of his own releases, his Dub Jusic album and also his showcase LP (which is a seriously elusive vinyl!).

It's good to see that books written by the actual artists/producers are released. Thinking of the new Bunny Lee book and also Roydale Andersons brilliant re-telling of his musical ventures. I know also that King Culture is going to release a book soon.
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby rastapopoulos » Tue Jul 17, 2012 11:04 pm

Recommended reading for anyone who wants to have a look inside the 70s and 80s reggae scene from a unique perspective. Junia is the first and up to now the only Reggae artist who wrote a book, telling the story in his own words.

Indeed he was running the Joint International label with Keith Hudson, which after Keith Hudson's passing has become the Jusic International label on which he still releases music. He operated as a co-producer and co-writer for Hudson. And, among many other things, took care of the Joint International record shop in the basement of Hudson's home in Brooklyn.

http://www.kenstar.nl/fotos.php?p=2202
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby kalcidis » Thu Sep 13, 2012 7:04 am

Just finished reading it. I must admit I was a bit disappointed since it felt as it wasn't about the music as much as it was a tirade against everyone that had wronged him. Too bad because I had high hopes on the book.
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby j j » Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:20 am

Yes Kal ,especially his ex wife & the wilsons ...man i got abit sick of them myself :)

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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby kalcidis » Thu Sep 13, 2012 3:17 pm

Another part I found very disturbing was him touching the subject of homosexuality. Especially at the end of chapter five. I'm still not certain if he picked the can to throw at the people trying to hurt the guy or at the guy that was being pursued by the people. Due to the context and some later comments in the book I unfortunately came to the conclusion that it would have been he was going to throw the can at the guy.

After the dance was over and a few stragglers were slowly leaving the premises, guys and girls were still hanging around the grass under the trees someone shouted that they found a known gay guy asleep on one of the speaker boxes. Everyone who were earlier laid back and chilling suddenly came to life and wanted to impress the girls with how macho they were started chasing him. I picked up a can to throw but when I saw the odds I changed my mind. This guy ran all the way to Cross Roads Police Station.

/.../ [here he describes how the police come to the place and start firing shots after the people]

... that was my first example of how seriously certain police officers defended their gay friends. These cops had the area under a siege. I had to sleep in an abandoned garage abandoning all hopes of trying to get home, truly scary night.


Everyone are entitled to their opinion be it they hate homosexuals or not, but defending the right to be violent to someone based on their sexuality just turns my stomach. A scary night for whom I wonder?
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby underated » Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:12 pm

kalcidis wrote:
It's good to see that books written by the actual artists/producers are released. .


Yes indeed we need more books & less music.
1st hand accounts are much better than 2nd or 3rd :)
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby kalcidis » Thu Sep 13, 2012 5:38 pm

What is needed is more money in the pockets of these artists. Whether be it through music or writing :) I immensely enjoyed Roydale Anderson's book which I can recommend wholeheartedly for anyone interested in a getting an insight of how it could be to be a producer in the 70's and 80's. Also some great info on the incredible King Tubby and of course also Jah Mel.

Otherwise it has been a quite good year for reggae literature with the Bunny Lee book being quite worthwhile (even though it needed hundreds and hundreds more pages...) and the Rub-A-Dub by Beth Lesser book being nothing less than crucial. Ray Hurford's Small Axe Roots Guide was also very good. Haven't "read" Jamaican Dancehall Signs but looking to order it as soon as possible. Any other books that I might have missed?
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby capullo » Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:46 pm

oh yes, desi and mrs. wilson :D less info about them would be more for sure. interesting book nevertheless. it's a bit difficult to read though. not so charming stories about jah stitch either :roll:
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby kalcidis » Sat Nov 17, 2012 6:06 pm

To be honest I can't remember what he said about Jah Stitch (was it something about him trying to intimitade Junia?) but it surely was no holds barred when he wrote about Keith Hudson.
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby capullo » Sun Nov 18, 2012 3:19 pm

not very pleasant. jah stitch is turning quite agressive over some records and royalties. it's on the last 2 pages of chapter 29 - (after the picture with junior and frankie paul).
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Re: Junia Reggae - The Journey form King Street

Postby capullo » Thu Nov 22, 2012 1:12 pm

bitterness till the very last drop. it's a pity as it has it's good and interesting moments.
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