Shashemene

Talk to your hearts content.....but keep it sweet! No record sales, live events listings or ebay labba labba.

Moderator: B&F Moderator

Shashemene

Postby DMc » Fri Jan 14, 2005 2:32 am

After all this talk 'bout moving Bob, have any of you visited Shashemene?

Just wondering what the community is like there……
DMc
DMc
 
Posts: 111
Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2004 3:58 am
Location: Cheeseland

Postby DMc » Sat Jan 15, 2005 4:39 pm

Looks like the town is a dusty cross-roads.


http://www.mediaethiopia.com/photoessay/photo_essay_Shashemene_04.htm


Community photos

http://ethiopie.50megs.com/rastas.html


"Shashemene - Rasta Dreams, Junctions, and Cross-roads at the Great Ethiopian Rift Valley"
Shashemene has always been a town for the restless; the kind who could not stay at a place long enough to discover the beauty of a place. As a junction not only on the Addis - Nairobi road, but also on the Addis - Goba, Addis-Arba Minch roads, Shashemene has a developed a unique character. Cheap restaurants, motels, and a 24-hour active sex-trade work force keep the town humming in Kremt and Bega. The town has always played a 'support role' to the more beautiful towns of Awassa, Welayita Sodo and Wendo-Genet (the paradise hill station in the Great Ethiopian Rift Valley).

But things seem to be changing slowly - even for Shashemene - as the Rasta community that suffered through the Mengistu years seems to be regaining its vigor and zeal. The richest sheikh on this side of the Red Sea - Sheikh Al Amoudi - has also bought a farm near Shashemene and is experimenting growing wheat and Teff. The Sheikh's vision reminds us the vision of the late Ato Bekele who built his trademark hotel in Shashemene more than 30 years ago. The EPRDF people seem very confused on what to do with Shashemene. Many years ago (about 5 years ago...to be precise), the town of Sodo further south had confused Meles and his ethno-centrists because not only the Sedama but also the Welayita people inhabit the place. The EPRDF people with their loyal cadres and officials decided to create a new language - a language that is in between Sidama and Welayita and even gave it a name - something like Welango. It is an incredible story of an attempt to re-invent Ethiopia. So, for a town like Shashemene where Sidamas, Oromos, Amharas, Gurages, Hadiyas, and numerous others trade with other, the politics of economy seems to be much stronger than anything else.

A trip to Shashemene will be - of course - incomplete without dropping by the Rasta community. As we drove to the Rasta village, we passed by Sheikh Al Amoudi's new farm (the joke is that among the wheat and teff farm of the Sheikh, grass of a different kind - more potent than Qhat - may be growing). A first impression is that of the Jamaica hills without the humidity. The beautiful and well-kept farms, gardens, and numerous houses reminded us that we need to allow more of our Caribbean brothers to immigrate to the land of their choice - the African Zion.

To the brothers who welcomed us there and honored us with the most enlightening conversation on that rainy afternoon at the Rasta village, we extend our sincere regards. By the way, the smoke from the incense burner - you assured us it was incense - made us feel weird all the way to Addis.
http://ethiopie.50megs.com/shashemene.html
DMc
DMc
 
Posts: 111
Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2004 3:58 am
Location: Cheeseland

Postby DMc » Sat Jan 15, 2005 4:46 pm

Shashemene is a commercial town located in the Ethiopian Rift Valley Shoa province. It is a central city and inland port and lies 250kms to the south of Addis Ababa at the southern tip of Shoa administrative region and bordering Sidamo. The region has a good climate, abundant rainfall with an annual coverage of 800 mm and fertile soil favorable for agriculture. Shashamene a small district village town gained international attention in the African Diaspora when 500 acres of its fertile land was granted as a gift to the Black people of the West in 1948 by His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Haile Selassie I, the then reigning Ethiopian Emperor. The Italian invasion of Ethiopia did more to ignite Pan-African sentiment than any other event in modern times. In the folklore of Africans in and outside of Africa, Ethiopia was the bastion and symbol of African freedom and independence. In the Bible, Blacks read that Ethiopia was the land of Queen of Sheba and its Monarch represented a direct genealogical link to the Solomonic Throne. To Blacks, Ethiopia was the sacred land that Homer the Greek historian wrote about as the land where the gods loved to be.'

Now Italy's threat to the Motherland's sovereignty, consequent invasion and occupation of international demonstration and support from Blacks for Ethiopia and its Emperor in the war of resistance. Rallies and fundraising events were carried out by Blacks throughout the United States and the Caribbean to help Ethiopia to regain her independence. On the request of Black church leaders and organizations in the U.S.A, the Emperor sent his personal Emissary Dr. Malaku E. Bayen to organize the support of Africans in the Americas. This was done officially under the banner of the Ethiopian World Federation Inc(E.W.F) registered in New York, U.S.A. Exactly 7 years after the Liberation of Ethiopia and the return of the Emperor in 1941, the triumphant Emperor Haile Selassie I, gave a gift to the Black peoples of the West of 500 acres of land in Shashemene, Shoa Province.

SETTLERS FROM JAMAICA

Between 1952 and 1974 approximately 22 families migrated to Shashemene to take up the offer of the Shashemene Land Grant. The vast majority of these early settlers came from Jamaica, as the Rastafarian groups in Jamaica were most appreciative of the Emperor's gift and stretched forth her hands to receive it. In 1975, the Provisional Government of Ethiopia issued the land reform proclamation, nationalising all lands in Ethiopia, turning them over to the peasant association. This included the seizure of the Shashemene Land Grant. In 1975, the remaining Jamaican settlers made a petition throughout the Embassy of Jamaica for the return of the land grant. Only 100 acres was returned and divided among the settlers. Today, the population of the settlement has grown to over 200 of which 65% are children born on the land grant, Shashemene Ethiopia.

from


http://groups.msn.com/TwelveTribesLiveUp/jamaicanrastafariandevelopmentcommunity.msnw
DMc
DMc
 
Posts: 111
Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2004 3:58 am
Location: Cheeseland


Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: django, Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 7 guests