Is Bob Marley Overrated?

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is Bob Marley overrated?

yes
14
27%
no
37
73%
 
Total votes : 51

Is Bob Marley Overrated?

Postby ephteeay » Sat Jan 08, 2005 8:19 am

..
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Er no.

Postby Anonymous » Sat Jan 08, 2005 9:07 am

Er, no.

Can you srtart a separate poll to ask whether he is underrated. A 'yes' click for me on that one.

Massive musical, political and cultural significance on the late 20th cent. Up there with Miles Davis imo.

MSE
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Postby ephteeay » Sat Jan 08, 2005 9:39 am

thats good to know someone thinks that (that also probably means there are many more that agree with you..)

you being a 'big' reggae listener (in comparison to the people who only listen to "other music and bob marley") and thinking that, makes me think that there is a reason for there to be SO many marley cds in the shops.. so many people that listen to marley etc.. something i cant understand to tell you the truth.. maybe when i grow up ill understand the fuss about him (and understand why nobody else got the recognition he got)...
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Postby Curly Locks » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:24 am

A No vote for me.
It's easy to get caught up in a Marley hate campaign in a mistaken effort to become a 'True' Reggae fan. Poo pooed as he often is by those eager to disassociate themselves from the mainstream to concentrate on the obscure in a bleak effort to be somebody.
The thing is that many forget not just his significance as a figure of the 20th cent. (as pointed out above), but that he was a songsmith without rival. Look at his lyrics, remove them from the music if you must and just look at the words. He had a lyrical and poetic sensibility that comes raining down on some lucky sod's head but once in every 25 years.
The man was Roots with a most definite capital R.
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Postby James » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:41 am

I never really listen to the Island stuff but find myself going back to his Studio One material time and time again. It's wonderful, some of the finest music ever recorded.
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Postby django » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:53 am

I don`t think he`s over rated, just that so many others are under rated.

All the best

Andy
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Postby ephteeay » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:57 am

It's easy to get caught up in a Marley hate campaign in a mistaken effort to become a 'True' Reggae fan. Poo pooed as he often is by those eager to disassociate themselves from the mainstream to concentrate on the obscure in a bleak effort to be somebody.


i dont hate marley.. maybe i do sometimes.. or think that i do...but not "to be somebody" but i get a little annoyed that other artists didnt become better known..i also cant see the difference between him and someone else .whenever i hear marley playing (not things like "could you be loved") i like it.. but dont know if it is because that is all i listened to in the past (and it brings back memories of my teenage years at school) or something else...

maybe his english was just better than the others... something i dont really look out for... i also love tunes with very understandable/simple lyrics.. e.g "love me girl" by leroy sibbles.. or jacob miller's "baby i love you so" maybe im just not looking for the 'poetry' about politics etc and other stuff other people notice.. but i rather hear the singing in combination with the riddim and of course the lyrics which doesnt make marley better than freddy mckay, barrington levy (at 16 yrs old), hugh mundell, leroy sibbles/heptones etc..

(something else.. im not trying to start an argument.. i was just interested in seeing if people that listen to only reggae or mainly reggae like marley as much as the radio does.)
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Postby ephteeay » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:58 am

yes django.. i was thinking of asking "is bob marley overrated or is almost everyone else underrated?"
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Postby BMC » Sat Jan 08, 2005 11:24 am

He's not overrated imo. I rate at least 80% of Marley's output, also the Island stuff. The reason why he gets played and he got big is because of him focussing on a broader audience. His lyrics maybe roots, but his riddims are different from most of the other roots riddims from the era. When he was at Island, none of his riddims were used in the exact way they were recorded for other people to voice over or deejay over. They were different, more poppy in style I guess. Besides the music, also the character Bob Marley helped him getting the star he became. His most popular songs of the legend album are not poetric at all I would say. I mean, Is This Love, Satisfy My Soul, One Love, Could You Be Loved, No Woman No Cry, Waiting In Vain aren't really dealing with tough issues, but with issues everyone can releate to. Songs like Get Up Stand Up, Stir It Up and other bigger hits are mainly loved, because they "sound so relax" or something like that. His best songs imo from his Island period, are the roots-based songs like Ride Natty Ride, Africa Unite, Zion Train, Crazy Baldheads etc etc, songs friends of mine who like legend don't really enjoy compared to the known ones.
I'd say the main audience rates him for the feel-good reggae style, but a majority doesn't listen to the more roots songs I think. The reggae audience rates him for different reasons and often play the 'legend' songs the least of 'm all, but do respect Marley for many other songs and for showing reggae to the world. Simply judged on what he achieved and the quality of his songs he imo is not overrated at all, that man was huge.
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Postby Ras Berry » Sat Jan 08, 2005 11:24 am

No! I also think the overdubbed 'original' release of "Catch A Fire" is better than the latterday 'Original Jamaican mixes'!

8)
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Postby Pluto » Sat Jan 08, 2005 7:45 pm

ephteeay wrote:maybe when i grow up ill understand the fuss about him (and understand why nobody else got the recognition he got)...


Well, he wasn't just lucky that he got that recognition, that's for sure. No doubt the contract with a major label & Blackwell's promotion helped quite a bit but I can't imagine any other reggae artist with the vision and focus Marley had in what he did and his knowledge in how he could reach a wider audience - i.e. Bunny couldn't stand the constant touring & recording routine and gave up early. And although it is usually said that his output was too watered-down for international appeal, I suppose that most jamaican artists would love to have the such artistic freedom in recording. And almost every other example of a reggae artist recording for a major label and an international audience shows that unlike Marley they've compromised their sound & ideas rather than expanding them.

As for his significance as a "third world figure", it could be said that there are places in the world where people might have never heard of Elvis, Beatles or the Stones, but they certainly know Bob Marley.
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Postby Anonymous » Sat Jan 08, 2005 7:47 pm

Bob Marley wasn't just another reggae singer, he was a world leader.

Respect

Gordon
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Postby Dr Sleeper » Sat Jan 08, 2005 8:20 pm

My thoughts on Marley is that after 1973, he was pretty much a genre onto himself, removed from the mainstream reggae scene. ie: no King Tubby dubs, no Dillinger DJ versions, etc. Working with the big bucks of Island and the savvy of Chris Blackwell (and please let's not get into a Chris Blackwell-bashing thread), he cut extremely well-crafted music that really stands apart from most 1970s sounds. And I second what Gordon said.
They have used guns to spoil the fun and force tasteless music upon the land. (Prince Buster)
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Postby DrSuperlove » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:14 pm

overrated in the mainstream & underrated among reggae snobs, an album like African Herbsman is a towering work in reggae second to none but we can't talk about that because it ain't cool, na'amean
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Postby Aaron » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:36 pm

Ras Berry wrote:I also think the overdubbed 'original' release of "Catch A Fire" is better than the latterday 'Original Jamaican mixes'!



For years, the only Bob I had only was Natty Dread. While I loved it (and was quite familiar with and generally liked his Island stuff), I still never felt compelled to actually buy any of the rest of his back catalog--over-familiarity, p'raps.

However, I was very keen to hear the JA mixes of Catch A Fire , having got a taster on the Classic Albums show about the album. "Whiteworst" himself wondered aloud, while listening to unvarnished mixes on camera for the doc, why they didn't simply release as was. Anyway, I picked up the Deluxe Edition as soon as it came out and was completely blown away and wholly back riding the Marley bandwagon. I've got several more (including Trojan's Complete Marley/Upsetter box) since and really like them (except Rastaman Vibration).

Bob Marley, not under- or overrated; everyone gets him--he is simply rated.
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